How to Protect Your Garden During the Hot Summer

Illustration for article titled How to Protect Your Garden During the Hot Summer

Summer is a tough season for gardeners all over the country. It can get pretty hot and dry, which leads to drought and withered crops. The constant changes in temperatures can stress garden plants and thus hinder a rich yield, but you can do some thing to protect your garden during the hot summer.

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If you want to make sure your green heaven produces plenty of fruits and vegetables (or just keep your blooms flowering) throughout the whole summer, well into fall, you should stay busy and alert. The scorching sun and high temperatures torture both greens and gardeners, but here are some handy tricks by gardeners around Didcot to help you keep your backyard home garden thriving and growing without dying in the heat.

Protect Potted and Hanging Basket Plants from Heat Stress

Illustration for article titled How to Protect Your Garden During the Hot Summer
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Any plants in containers are very susceptible, especially hanging baskets and any pots in more exposed positions. You should know that any plant that is pot or container-bound is susceptible to heat stress. Hanging basket greens are in danger, too. You should pick a place in your home or garden that has shade during the hottest hours of the day and water them at least once a day. However, don’t go an make one of the most common gardening mistakes - do the watering after the sun sets. If you do it when the sun is still high, you will burn your foliage.

Another tip is to use water gels and water crystal products to help lock moisture in the soil. You could also buy watering bottles and put them on the top of the flower pots, just like bird water bottle. Don’t forget the layer of mulch and you can add extra heat stress protection by wrapping the containers in bark or hessian. Moisture meters are also an option. This way you can monitor how moist is the soil of your potted greens and water them when needed.

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Irrigation and Watering Systems

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Irrigation systems are used generally to water lawns, but you can incorporate them in your backyard gardening pretty well. It’s a common misconception that you should let the sprinklers on through out the whole day. You should use them at night or early in the morning. If they are on during the day, the burning sun will hinder deep watering and evaporate the moist from the soil. This will lead to burnt garden crops and withering flowers.

Make sure your garden watering system works properly and there aren’t any “blind spots” that don’t get enough of the vital liquid. You can use some of the handy tips from here. Don’t go overboard, too. You don’t want to give your greens wet feet and make them rot from all the moisture. The key to success is regular, deep watering.

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Save Stressed Plants

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Sometimes your greens might suffer plenty of heat damage despite your efforts to provide them with enough shade and water. Fear not, you can still revive the dying plants back to life! It can be a bit difficult, but don’t give up.

Get a big bucket and fill it with water and a solution of Seasol. You could also use compost tea if you prefer to stick to organic gardening (the better choice). Submerge the damaged pots in the bucket or use it to water the garden crops. This will revive them, just make sure you give them a good soaking so the roots get plenty of the vital liquid and absorb all the vitamins.

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Don’t forget to regularly deadhead and light prune all of the foliage in your home garden. This will stimulate growth and new flowering season.

Use Mulch and Shade Cloth

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Just like mentioned above, you should use mulch if you want to keep the soil cool and retain moisture levels.If it gets too hot in your area, spread a thick layer of mulch. This will make the soil temperatures at least 5-10 degrees cooler than air temperatures.

When it comes to mulch types, you can use bark, wood chips, straw, pine needles and other. Just make sure that if you use wood chips, they are not from trees that died because of infections. Once you pick and spread your “blanket” of garden mulch, water it thoroughly and you can rest assured that your greens will be cool during the hot days and safe from heat stress.

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Another option is to cover all container bound and garden plants with shade cloth. However, don’t spread it all over them, 50-70% coverage should be enough. After all, they still need sunlight in order to grow strong and healthy and produce fruits and flowers.

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